LEGACY COLLECTION | Acquired Artworks

Enjoy exploring the Legacy Collection – a special collection of historic artworks, gifts to the City of Fort Worth and purchased works – with the oldest dated 1893 to the most recent, gifted in 2019.  The Fort Worth Art Commission’s process to review proposed artwork donations is included in the Fort Worth Public Art Master Plan Update.

The memorial commemorates the British civil engineer credited with saving over a dozen lives from the tragic 1890 fire that consumed the Texas Spring Palace, Fort Worth's first significant building. Hayne, the sole fatality, died from injuries sustained in the fire. In 1893, the Women's Humane Association commissioned Lloyd Bowman to create a memorial monument including a marble portrait bust and working fountain. Evaline Sellors' bronze bust replaced the original when the monument was relocated and restored in 1934.
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Lloyd Bowman and Evaline Sellors | Al Hayne Memorial Monument | 1893 | Bronze | Haynes Memorial Triangle
A marble bust portraying John Peter Smith (1831-1902) sits on top of a tall granite base. John Peter Smith was an important Fort Worth leader and philanthropist. A historical marker at the sculpture details his many achievements and altruistic contributions. As Mayor Smith directed the establishment of many municipal services, including the school system and the Water Department. He donated land for parks, cemeteries and a city hospital, which bears his name and is still operational. Smith died in 1901 in Missouri while on a promotional trip for the city. He is buried in Oakwood Cemetery, land that he donated to the city.
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Lloyd Bowman | John Peter Smith | 1906 | Marble | City Hall Park
Wyatt C. Hedrick and Elmer G. Withers' architectural proposal for the Texas Centennial celebration of 1936 illustrates the classical revival and modern building styles found today in the Will Rogers Memorial Complex. In addition to the coliseum, auditorium, and memorial tower two auxiliary buildings - a casino / banquet hall and a merchants / automobile exhibit hall - are featured but were never realized. Hedrick was one of Fort Worth's most prolific architects between 1920 and 1960.
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Wyatt Hedrick | Buildings for Pleasure Grounds, Parks and Playgrounds | 1935 | Work on Paper | Not Currently on View
Designed and fabricated under the direction of local architect Herman Koeppe, the ceramic tile friezes over the Will Rogers Coliseum and Auditorium were reputed to be the largest set of tile paintings in the world when they were completed in 1935. Each mosaic is composed of 1,606 hand-painted tiles. Beginning with Spanish exploration of the New World until 1936, the murals depict the economic and cultural heritage of the southwest and Texas.
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Attributed to Kenneth Gale | Untitled (Historic Murals - Auditorium) | 1937 | Painted Ceramic | Will Rogers Memorial Center Auditorium
Designed and fabricated under the direction of local architect Herman Koeppe, the ceramic tile friezes over the Will Rogers Coliseum and Auditorium were reputed to be the largest set of tile paintings in the world when they were completed in 1935. Each mosaic is composed of 1,606 hand-painted tiles. Beginning with Spanish exploration of the New World until 1936, the murals depict the economic and cultural heritage of the southwest and Texas.
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Attributed to Kenneth Gale | Untitled (Historic Murals - Coliseum) | 1937 | Ceramic Tile | Will Rodgers Memorial Center Coliseum
When American cowboy humorist Will Rogers was killed in a plane crash in 1935, longtime friend Amon G. Carter commissioned a life-sized bronze sculpture depicting Rogers on his favorite horse, Soapsuds, planned to welcome visitors to the newly-renamed Will Rogers Memorial Center. The sculpture was completed in 1939 but Carter withheld installation until a suitable dignitary could do the honor of dedicating it. General Dwight D. Eisenhower unveiled the sculpture in 1947 while President Truman's daughter, Margaret, sang.
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Electra Waggoner Biggs | Riding into the Sunset | 1942 | Bronze | Will Rogers Memorial Center
Six hand-painted, glazed tile friezes above the entrances of the historic Livestock Exhibition Barns at the Will Rogers Memorial Complex depict farm animals in pastoral scenes. Four cattle mosaics and single mosaics showing sheep and swine indicate the use of each building. Designed by Kenneth Gale, long-time artistic director at the Mosaic Tile Company, they murals were installed in 1936.
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Attributed to Kenneth Gale | Untitled (Historic Murals - Cattle I) | 1948 | Ceramic Tile | Will Rodgers Memorial Center
Six hand-painted, glazed tile friezes above the entrances of the historic Livestock Exhibition Barns at the Will Rogers Memorial Complex depict farm animals in pastoral scenes. Four cattle mosaics and single mosaics showing sheep and swine indicate the use of each building. Designed by Kenneth Gale, long-time artistic director at the Mosaic Tile Company, they murals were installed in 1936.
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Attributed to Kenneth Gale | Untitled (Historic Murals - Sheep) | 1948 | Ceramic Tile | Will Rodgers Memorial Center
One of Fort Worth's most influential sculptors, Charles Williams has long been recognized for his innovative exploration of abstract form and inventive use of new materials. Solar Disc, created late in the artist's career, was fabricated from industrial stainless-steel discs. The two opposing convex circles are carefully calibrated to emphasize a sense of depth and introduce the element of balance. Reflecting light from all directions, the spheres radiate a dynamic flow of energy that evokes celestial associations.
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Charles T. Williams | Solar Disc | 1964 | Stainless Steel | Fort Worth Botanic Gardens
The bronze relief represents a period of exciting technical innovation in bronze casting by Fort Worth artists at mid-twentieth century. An apprentice to Charles Williams (in 1961), Ed Storms developed a facility for transferring the freedom of gestural abstraction to the medium of sculpture. Vision of the Third Eye exemplifies his improvisational manner of making sculpture and in its energetic, organic quality he reveals his fascination with the writings of Lewis Carroll.
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Ed Storms | Vision of the Third Eye | 1965 | Bronze Relief | Fort Worth Botanic Gardens
Two sculptural water features by Fort Worth artist Gene Owens flank the entrance to the Deborah Beggs Moncrief Garden Center. A pioneer in modernist sculpture techniques, Owens is well known for his association with the Fort Worth Circle, as well as his apprenticeship with Isamu Noguchi. Composed of hand-formed ceramic blocks, Runnels is an excellent example of the artist's material dexterity and restraint. Subtle and playful, each of the monochromatic fountains terminate dramatically in sunken tile basins.
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Gene Owens | Runnels | 1970 | Ceramic | Fort Worth Botanic Gardens
Noted as one of the world's foremost kinetic sculptors and known for his signature grinding patterns, Rickey created mobile objects that were set in motion by natural forces. Twelve Triangles Hanging is a beautiful example of Rickey's restrained design in which raw materials are highlighted and surfaces are aggressively burnished to reflect ambient light. The site-specific sculpture was partially funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts.
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George Rickey | Twelve Triangles Hanging | 1974 | Stainless Steel | City Hall
The only surviving example of a 1974 "Art in Public Places" initiative in Fort Worth, the Zipper Mural refers to the building's original occupant work clothing manufacturer Williamson-Dickie. The painted mural originally featured a cloud scene, but a well-intentioned, but poorly executed repainting in the late 1990's was a failure. In 2005, Gentling was to redesign the skyscape but he died suddenly. Gentling's sister, Suzanne, a recognized artist, completed the project. Her single, standing feather symbolizes Stuart's keen interest in avian art.
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Stuart Gentling / Suzanne Gentling | Untitled (Zipper Mural) | 1974 / 2005 | Acrylic | City IT Building
The life-sized bronze sculpture honors Fort Worth businessman, philanthropist and civic leader Charles Tandy. Strategic marketing and diversification transformed the Tandy family wholesale leather business into the world largest retailer of consumer electronic products. When Tandy died in 1978, Tandy Corporation was a billion-dollar multinational corporation, headquartered in downtown Fort Worth, was worth The Burnett Foundation, originally the Burnett-Tandy Foundation, established by Anne Burnett Tandy to honor her late husband, continues a legacy of charitable giving and community support.
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Jim Reno | Charles Tandy | 1980 | Bronze | Tandy Hall
A large frog graces each end of the reflecting pool at the entrance to the Fort Worth Botanic Gardens. Each frog is from the same casting. They each are seen standing upright and have their proper right leg raised, resting upon the proper left leg. Their front legs are outstretched and their heads are raised. The appearance is as if each frog is leaping into the pool.
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Andre Harvey | Spring Ballet | 1981 | Bronze | Fort Worth Botanic Gardens
Fort Worth western artist Jack Bryant's powerful dynamic action packed bronze sculpture at the entrance to the Amon Carter Jr. Exhibits Hall is an authentic three-dimensional representation from a photograph of the famed bucking horse "Midnight". Sculpture is mounted on a granite base. Dedication information is inscribed on front of the base. In Flanders Fields (text of poem published in 1915) is inscribed on proper left side of base.
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Jack Bryant | Midnight | 1984 | Bronze | Will Rogers Memorial Center
Sculpture is mounted on a granite base. Dedication information is inscribed on front of the base. In Flanders Fields (text of poem published in 1915) is inscribed on proper left side of base.
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Barvo Walker | Duty | 1987 | Bronze
Commissioned as an official Texas Sesquicentennial project, this life sized sculpture depicts Bill Pickett (1870 -1932) who was famous as the first bulldogger in rodeo, originating the event, and the first African American named to the Cowboy Hall of Fame. The sculpture depicts Pickett in the act of wrestling the steer to the ground. As Pickett digs his boot heels into the ground, the steer's proper left horn is held within Pickett's proper left elbow and he grasps the steer's lip and nostrils with his proper right hand and twists the steer's head up and backwards toward Pickett's body.
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Lisa Perry | The First Bulldogger-Bill Pickett | 1987 | Bronze | Fort Worth Stockyards
The untitled Northside Branch Library Mural, designed and painted by Fort Worth artist Anthony Dominguez, was one of the first painted murals in the Fort Worth Public Art Collection. The mural uses symbol painting to tell the history of the City of Fort Worth and charmingly mirrors the WPA created ceramic tile murals on the Coliseum and Auditorium buildings at the Will Rogers Memorial Center which narrate a similar city history but in a figurative style. Painted on the rear of the library facing southeast and overlooking downtown Fort Worth, the mural makes an impressive appearance when approaching from the south entrance on Central Park Boulevard.
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Anthony Dominguez | Untitled | 1987 | Painted Mural | Northside Branch Library
A frontier woman, her sleeves rolled up suggesting she had been working with her hands, waves to company either arriving or departing. Her strength and spirit are expressed through her appearance and stance. She embodies the hard working woman tending to her home and land while the men are away on a cattle drive. This bronze statue was donated to the City of Fort Worth in 1990 and resides in the Fort Worth Botanical Garden where 'Spirit of Woman' waves to visitors of the gardens.
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Jack Bryant | Spirit of Woman | 1988 | Bronze | Fort Worth Botanic Gardens
Given in loving membory of Caren Courtney Koslow by the Fort Worth Garden Club, and Koslow's family and friends, Niads features three figures relaxing within the landscape under several trees.
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Glenna Goodacre | Naiads | 1989 | Bronze | Fort Worth Botanic Gardens
Created Chris Powell in 1989, to be alongside me consist of four abstracted pieces atop identical cylinder based. The high-fire stoneware, according to Powell was a reduction of ideas and combining images. â€"I was thinking about the figure, plant life, rock formations as they relate to the effects of time and the changing of relationships", states Powell. Three pieces stand very closed to each other while one is place off to the side giving a sense of a change in relationship as Powell mentions. This work of art can be located outside the Dorothea Leonhardt Lecture Hall at the Fort Worth Botanical Gardens.
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Chris Powell | to be alongside me | 1989 | Ceramic | Fort Worth Botanic Gardens
A single frog sits upon a lily pad, positioned as if he is about to leap into the pond within which he sits. His back legs are spread and his upper body is raised upon his front legs, his chin raised.
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Evaline Sellors | Frog | 1991 | Bronze | Fort Worth Botanic Gardens
Each of these four finials marks the corners of the courtyard in which they are placed. They are each placed upon cast concrete plinths atop a brick wall. Cast in sets of two, each depicts natural elements, both sets being covered with cast leaves and vines. One pair has various birds and a bird's nest with baby birds protruding from the leaves. The other pair has squirrels and a rabbit at the base.
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Evaline Clarke Sellors | Nature's Finials | 1993 | Bronze | Fort Worth Botanic Gardens
This life-size sculpture depicts Comanche Chief Quanah Parker. Dressed in a traditional Native American dress, the figure holds a six feathered headdress in his right hand. The sculpture was donated to the City by Chisholm Trail Roundup, Inc.
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Jack Bryant | Quanah Parker | 1993 | Bronze | Hyatt Place Fort Worth Historic Stockyards
Born in Forth Worth in 1929, Jack Bryant became known for both his realistic paintings and his bronze work - generally of animals, landscapes and historic cowboy themes. Bryant has several works in the City of Fort Worth, including this one, which depicts a firefighter rescuing a small child, which stands in front of Fire Station #2, the City's oldest operating fire station. The statue was dedicated in honor of the 100th anniversary of professional firefighting in Fort Worth, and now belongs to the Fort Worth Public Art Community Legacy Collection
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Jack Bryant | Save the Future | 1993 | Bronze | Fire Station #2
The sculpture is comprised of eight elements: one tall vertical element and seven square blocks. Each block has cut edges with honed tops and the upright carved element has a figurative or anthropomorphic quality, suggesting shoulders and a neck.
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Chris Powell | along the river | 1994 | Granite | Heritage Park
This bronze was commissioned by the board of directors of the southwestern exposition and livestock show and dedicated as part of its centennial celebration. John Justin, born January 17, 1917 in Nocona, Texas, grew up working in the Justin Boot company factory which was founded by his grandfather. After attending Texas Christian University he returned to the boot business in 1949 and three years later became Justin boot company president. John Justin was elected to be chairman of the board of the Fort Worth Stock Show and Rodeo in 1982, and served as Mayor Pro Tem in 1959 and 1960 and Mayor from 1961 to 1963. This sculpture of Justin on his favorite mount "Baby Blue" was created in 1996, and now belongs to the Fort Worth Public Art Community Legacy Collection.
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Jack Bryant | John Justin and Baby Blue | 1996 | Bronze | Will Rogers Memorial Center - Equestrian Multi-Purpose Building
Created in 1998 and part of the Fort Worth Public Art Community Legacy Collection, Fishing Rock is installed in a pond at the Fort Worth Botanic Gardens, and depicts three large herons sunning themselves, each with their wings unfurled. This sculpture won the 2001 Silver Medal at the National Sculpture Society Annual Awards Exhibition.
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Bob Guelich | Fishing Rock | 1998 | Bronze | Fort Worth Botanic Gardens
A visual play between form and function, Bench invites viewers to have a seat, but the abstract forms that protrude from the surface impede any practical usage of the sculpture. This piece was created during the 1999 Sculpture Symposium sponsored by the Arts Council of Fort Worth and Tarrant County. Afterwards, the artist donated this sculpture to the City of Fort Worth, and it is now part of the Fort Worth Public Art Community Legacy Collection.
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Cam Schoepp | Bench | 1999 | Limestone | Fort Worth Botanic Gardens
Hand carved and sanded from a single piece of limestone, Bull is composed of both geometric and amorphous forms. Situated close to the ground, the piece recalls the connection between livestock and agriculture. The sculpture was carved at the conclusion of the 1999 Sculpture Symposium that was sponsored by the Arts Council of Fort Worth and Tarrant County; and Powell later donated it to the City of Fort Worth. It is now part of the Fort Worth Public Art Community Legacy Collection
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Chris Powell | Bull | 1999 | Limestone | Fort Worth Botanic Gardens
Chiseled onto one side of the monolith is local animal life, and on the other is a pictographic representation of both natural and cosmic elements: sun, moon, stars, and water. This combination unites the botanical garden of the site with the cosmic garden of the sky to create a form that bridges worlds.
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Sandi Stein | Celestial Jazz | 1999 | Limestone | Fort Worth Botanic Gardens
Hats, a whimsical installation of five limestone sculptures by Fort Worth-based artist Cameron Schoepp, was created during the 1999 Sculpture Symposium, an Arts Council of Fort Worth and Tarrant County initiative that started city-wide conversations about public art. For over a decade, the installation was sited in General Worth Square in downtown Fort Worth. It was relocated to the Cultural District in 2013 where it complements the classic modern architecture of the Neil Ford designed building that houses the Fort Worth Community Arts Center.
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Cam Schoepp | Hats | 2000 | Limestone | Fort Worth Community Arts Center
Created during the 2000 Sculpture Symposium in Fort Worth, Pollen, is a seven-piece sculpture made from Texas Granite and Terrazo. This was Shoepp's second year to participate in the Sculpture Symposium, an event that brought awareness to the need for public art and gave the public the chance to interact and understand the processes of the artist. These seven pieces, displayed at the main entrance of Fort Worth Botanical Gardens and the BRIT, are multi-sided objects suggesting a theme many North Texans are familiar with, pollen. Pollen interacts with its environment physically and figuratively as it spreads itself in nature.
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Cam Schoepp | Pollen | 2000 | Granite, Terrazo | Fort Worth Botanic Gardens
This work was created in 2001 for the Fort Worth Garden Club, and is permanently located in the Fort Worth Botanic Garden in Fort Worth, Texas. The lyrical imagery sculpted in bas-relief cheerfully alludes to the happiness and beauty of the garden environment.
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Michael Pavlovsky | Birth of Love | 2001 | Bronze | Fort Worth Botanic Gardens
The John F. Kennedy bronze sculpture is part of a permanent interpretive exhibit and plaza sited in General Worth Square in downtown Fort Worth. Created by Texas artist, Lawrence M. Ludtke, a National Sculpture Society Fellow recognized for his portrait and figurative work, the sculpture commemorates Kennedy's last day in the City of Fort Worth.
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Lawrence Ludtke | JFK Tribute | 2003 | Bronze | General Worth Square
Marie's Bench commemorates the life of Marie Key Dulaney Pullen (1946-2005), whose advocacy for arts in education benefited thousands of Fort Worth Independent School District students. A great supporter of local artists, Pullan's inspiration sparked collaboration amongst her closest friends resulting in this site-specific artwork. Polished granite shapes mirror patterns of sunlight coming through the overhanging trees and two interlocking benches suggest the strength and intimacy of companionship.
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Alice Bateman | Maries Bench | 2008 | Granite | Fort Worth Botanic Gardens
Here she stood is composed of three carved limestone elements, created as part of the 1999 Sculpture Symposium held at the Botanic Gardens as a site-specific artwork for Capps Park. Of the three elements, one signifies an abstracted standing figure along with two smaller pieces that establish the space for the viewers.
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Chris Powell | here she stood | 2013 | Limestone | Capps Park
Girl Scout Nichibei Yuko-no Kizuna (The Friendship Bond of US-Japan Girl Scouts) is a diptych comprised of two mixed media paintings, each symbolizing international friendship. The artist employs oil and acrylic paints in addition to silver and gold leaf applications.
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Hiroko Tanaka | Girl Scout Nichibei Yuko-no Kizuna (The Friendship Bond of US-Japan Girl Scouts | 2014 | Mixed Media (oil, acrylic, gold and silver leaf) | Fort Worth Central Library
The painting features the high mountain desert landscape near Abiqui, New Mexico, second home to the artist, and is a study of a complex and expansive natural environment, with a commanding foreground and distant mesa skyline. Infused with ephemeral movement and subtle color, the painting explores themes of time and memory, subjects that have captivated the artist over a forty year career.
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Jim Woodson | Resolved Coalescing Continuum | 2014 | Oil on Canvas | Fort Worth Police - North Patrol Division
Tabachin Ribbon, by Yvonne Domenge, is one of four pieces from the series 'Interconnected: The Sculptures of Yvonne Domenge.' This 13 foot in diameter carbon steel sculpture, an abstracted representation of the Tabachin Tree found in Mexico, was donated to the City of Fort Worth in 2014 after a temporary exhibition in Chicago's Millennium Park. Yvonne Domenge, an internationally acclaimed sculptor and artist, describes her work as being fluid and alive and representative of nature. This elegant artwork brings together organic forms and man-made objects in its final home in front of Fort Worth City Hall.
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Yvonne Domenge | Tabachin Ribbon | 2014 | Steel | Fort Worth Municipal Court
The figurative bronze sculpture of a human and a dog (5 feet in height x 3 feet 5 inches in width x 2 feet 5 inches in depth) celebrates the special relationship between people and their animal companions and encourages pet adoption.
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Lorri Acott | Who Rescued Who? | 2016 | Bronze | Z Bonz Dog Park