ART IN PROGRESS | Creating Works that Resonate

Fort Worth Public Art has a host of diverse projects underway in various stages of the public art process including, planning, artist selection, preliminary design, final design, fabrication and installation, which are each listed in alphabetical order by the site name.

Coming soon!  A link to our Quarterly Project Status Report with more details on each project will be added to this page.

A new public art project at Alliance Park associated with the 2018 Bond Program. The Project Core Team has expressed interest in an artwork that serves as a landmark for the area, inviting visitors into the park. They also discussed ways the work may be engaging to a diverse audience.
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Alliance Park | Preliminary Design | Anitra Blayton |
A Sculpture Selection Process will allow a Project Core Team to review and select individual sculpture(s) from those presented by Curator Dennis Nance. Purchasing existing sculptures from Texas artists will move the project directly into implementation (acquisition, delivery and installation), and it will also allow works by Texas artists that may not be available via the commissioning process to become part of the Fort Worth Public Art Collection.
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Altamesa Boulevard | Artist Selection | Artist TBD |
The Bonnie Brae esplanade begins at E. Belknap Street and terminates at the circle drive off Yucca Avenue, directly in front of Amon Carter-Riverside High School, built in 1936. The Project Core Team asked that the artist's design be sensitive to the historical context of the area.
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Bonnie Brae Street | Preliminary Design | Peter Busby | Bonnie Brae Street
A new public art project along Chapel Creek Boulevard from White Settlement Road to Old Weatherford Road associated with 2018 Bond Program improvements.
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Chapel Creek Corridor | Artist Selection | Artist TBD |
Artist Elizabeth Akamatsu's Final Design titled Rising Strong is inspired by the Diamond Hill area's family legacy. The sculpture celebrates the community through the concept of planting a seed, setting roots, and growing a bountiful life. The proposed stainless steel sculpture includes flowers inspired by Diamond Hill's namesake and will reflect the colors of its surroundings. The artwork sits upon a concrete platform and is intended to act as a landmark for the neighborhood.
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Diamond Hill Community Center | Fabrication | Elizabeth Akamatsu | Diamond Hill Community Center
This sculpture will transform a civil rights-era bus into a public artwork that connects the struggle for equal rights and justice from a national narrative to a local one, highlighting connections between the two. Aluminum panels within the bus shell will focus on Willis Pace - Fort Worth's first black city bus driver, Montgomery Bus Boycott, Freedom Riders, and Desegregation Bussing. Additional panels will feature the Lenora Rolla Center, Grand Theater, Baker Chapel, and Ella Mae Shamblee Library, as "stops" and all play key roles in telling the area's story.
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East Rosedale Street (I 35 - 287) | Fabrication | Christopher Blay | Repurposed Transit Bus | I-35W to US287
Entitled Fabled, this Preliminary Design draws upon the library's role as a teller of stories and stories as creators of place. Composed of long, rectangular, slender wooden and glass rods that appear to be descending from the ceiling, the artwork steps off the form of a pillar captured in the act of assembling itself, representative of the stories already in place and the assembling of new voices of community members who have not yet been born or arrived here. Elements are intended revealing digital content, text and images. Likened to a deck of cards, the layered content elements will shuffle to create a variety of combinations over time.
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Far Southwest Library | Final Design | Area C | McCart Avenue and W. Risinger Road
Fire Station #26 is seen as a gateway between commercial and residential areas in this community. After spending 50 hours during a micro-residency with the firefighters, artist Julie Lazarus learned of the personal importance of the firefighters' helmet and its reputation as a â€"badge of honor." Her Final Design includes three series of helmets, each uniquely patterned, to represent the various personnel on each shift (A, B, and C) at the station. The helmets will be a combination of mirrored and brushed stainless steel. The work will be lit at night with an ultramarine blue colored light, echoing the color of the firefighters' trucks.
artists website
Fire Station #26 | Final Design | Julie Lazarus | Fire Station #26
Titled Splash-Over, Marshall Harris's design is intended to pay homage to water as an integral component of firefighting. The proposed stainless-steel artwork will stand nearly 20 feet tall, creating a stylized waterspout as if shooting from an invisible nozzle. The surface of the structure will be finished in an undulating swirl pattern, catching and moving reflected light patterns. The structure sits atop a concrete platform to allow for low profile lighting and simultaneously elevate the artwork to a position of high visibility and prominence. Words taken from conversations with firefighters during the artist's micro-residency will be incorporated around the raised platform.
artists website
Fire Station #43 | Final Design | Marshall Harris | Intersection of Camp Bowie W. Blvd. and Linkmeadow Dr.
Joe Barrington's Preliminary Design, titled Cowtown Dalmation, is a larger-than-life longhorn. The proposed stainless steel sculpture with splatters of silver and bronze spots is intended to reflect the area's rustic aesthetic and echo its western heritage. Inspired by a micro-residency with the Fort Worth Fire Department, the longhorn stands atop a native limestone rock facing the City which references the department's commitment to serving as a guardian to its citizens.
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Fire Station #45 | Fabrication | Joe Barrington | Fire Station #45
A new public art project associated with 2014 Bond improvements at Heritage Park.
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Heritage Park | Preliminary Design | Legge Lewis Legge |
This public art project is associated with the 2018 Bond Program provides an opportunity for an artist to create a unique, artistic experience along Horne Street near the intersections of Libbey Avenue and Humbert Avenue. The two neighborhood streets are separated by 0.1 mile (a 2-minute walk). Overall, the participatory artwork should be highly visible from a distance, create a layered experience, and connect the present-day diverse community to the area's roots. The artwork is expected to echo the vibrancy of Horne Street's past while reflecting the 24-hour life of today's Como "Main Street."
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Horne Street | Preliminary Design | Darryl Ratcliff |
A new public art project addressing the underpass at the intersection of I-35 and East Rosedale.
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I-35/Rosedale | Artist Selection | Artist TBD |
This public art project will seek to embody hope and rejuvenation, be positive, and speak to new beginnings. The Project Core Team expressed a desire for an artwork the community will rally around, that is highly visible, and that will be readily understood as art. The project, to be located at the intersection of Las Vegas Trail and Normandale Street, is associated with street improvements as part of the 2018 Bond Program.
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Las Vegas Trail | Preliminary Design | Mark Reigelman | Las Vegas Trail and Normandale Street
Artist Clifton Crofford's Final Design for West Magnolia Avenue includes three sculptures composed of bronze and glass: an acorn, a pinecone, and a magnolia seed pod. The imagery of seeds symbolizes the potential of the community and its residents to work together for future generations. Possible sites for the sculptures include the intersections of S. Henderson Street, 5th Avenue, and/or Lake Street along the pedestrian-friendly Magnolia Avenue corridor, located in the Near Southside district.
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Magnolia Avenue | Fabrication | Clifton Crofford | Magnolia Avenue
Bajuyo's One Way and Eggert's A Very Long Now encourage the viewer to consider time as linear and endless, but also as cyclical. Each sculpture's placement and rhythmic quality via repetition of elements reinforces the aspect of time in the work. These sculptures and their relationship give form to the relative endlessness of time as memory and experience circle, loop, and overlap. The work highlights the artists' understanding of our place in time and the world.
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Marine Creek Parkway | Final Design | Curator Iris Bechtol, Artists Leticia Bajuyo and Alicia Eggert | Marine Creek Parkway (at Longhorn Road and Cromwelll-Marine Creek Road)
A new public art project associated with the 2018 Bond Program.
artists website
Meacham Corridor | Planning | Artist TBD |
Working from a life-long fascination with origami, the artist will create a series of five sculptures along Forest Park Boulevard that walk the viewer through the progression of folding an origami bird. And not just any bird, but a Scissor Tail Flycatcher, a native species also known as the Texas bird-of paradise, that calls Texas and parts of Oklahoma and Kansas home. The artist intends these white sculptures to create a contrast to the blue sky and Trinity River and the green slopes leading up to the Holly Water Treatment Plant, providing commuters and trail users a respite on their way into and out of downtown along this busy corridor.
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Municipal Vehicle Maintenance Facility (Holly Water) | Fabrication | Lynne Bowman Cravens | Forest Park Blvd
One With the Bee invites the visitor to experience the work much as an insect would an actual flower. The sculpture is 20 foot high, designed to use ½" plate mild steel. From a 30-inch diameter base, the artwork will flare to a diameter of 10 feet toward the top. A 180-degree opening on one side of the piece allows the viewer to see the center pollination of the flower, which will be crafted in stainless steel.
artists website
N Z Boaz Park | Fabrication | Dixie Friend Gay |
The Preliminary Design for the underpass at North Beach and I-820 responds to the Project Core Team's interest in a gateway artwork that is bold and sparks intrigue. Merge Conceptual Design's series of bright colored "wind wheels" connect to the identity of the area and greater Fort Worth. With a total of 58 wheels made with bicycle components, the artwork will respond to the environmental elements of the site: wind passing through the underpass will push the wheels to spin at various speeds; and, light will illuminate the wheels' reflective surface, allowing tonal color shifts throughout the day.
artists website
N. Beach/820 Underpass | Final Design | Merge Conceptual Design | I-820 Underpass at North Beach
Julie Richey has designed a series of mosaic artworks for the North Animal Control Center. From gallivanting dogs to lounging cats, the artist will introduce several new "furry friends" to the complex. These playful animals and dynamic images are proposed for many different areas of the center, while highlighting the joy and adventure pets add to our lives.
artists website
North Animal Care & Service Center | Fabrication | Julie Richey | Mosaic | North Service Center
Twelve large-scale kinetic weathervane sculptures will be installed along approximately three miles of the North Beach Corridor, from Shiver Road to Timberland Boulevard. Pivoting with the direction of the wind, each unique sculpture will have the form of a native animal, bird or reptile, and will be made from locally-sourced recycled materials. The choice of materials will have a humorous connection with the creature depicted, such as an armadillo made of truck bumpers and shovel heads.
artists website
North Beach Street | Installation | Christopher Fennell | Upcycled Materials | North Beach Corridor
Open Plains, a new public artwork designed by Matthew Mazzotta, seeks to bring the outdoors in by transposing a natural scene within the community center lobby. Creating a focal point for the new building, a large grassy berm creates unique seating while a small group of sculptural birds glide gently overhead in a circle, moving their wings as they float in the airspace. The playful artwork is intended to give the viewer the experience of connecting with the open landscape that surrounds the community center, which is nestled within Northwest Community Park.
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Northwest Community Center | Final Design | Matthew Mazzotta | Southeast Corner within Northwest Community Park
Known for their expertise in incorporating native plants and grasses into residential and commercial garden design, REDENTA'S Landscape Design, LLC proposal complements Eliseo Garcia's limestone sculpture Nature's Essence and fulfills goals in the Overton & Foster Park Master Plan. The plan creates context around the sculpture inviting park visitors to engage with the sculpture via a walkway plaza and seating for observing the sculpture and the ecology in a new wildflower zone. The design creates a natural gathering space around the sculpture and provides site lines from the nearby roadways.
artists website
Overton Park Phase II | Preliminary Design | Redenta's Landscape Design | Landscape and hardscape | Overton Park
Artist Donna Dobberfuhl looked to Rosedale Street for the theme she has woven into enhancements along East Rosedale Street as part of the City's Polytechnic Heights Urban Village. Her large rose designs are carved directly into the brick that forms three kiosks spaced at intervals along East Rosedale Street across from the Texas Wesleyan University campus. Smaller groupings of roses in light colored cast stone adorn the low seating along East Rosedale Street directly in front of the university. A series of six metal plaques are currently in development, which will feature historic photographs from the community and will be installed onto the open sides of the three kiosks.
artists website
Polytechnic / Wesleyan Urban Village | Pending | Donna Dobberfuhl | Polytechnic / Wesleyan Urban Village
A new public art project at Riverside Park in association with park improvements as part of the 2018 Bond Program. The Project Core Team desires a large, impactful artwork or series of artworks with a thematic approach that might speak to the natural environment and would engage visitors and park users.
artists website
Riverside Park | Preliminary Design | Ball-Nogues Studio |
Drawing from craft, Virginia Fleck's sensory maze focuses on connectedness through multiple forms of weaving. Visitors can experience moire patterns as they move around the designed sculpture and weave in and out themselves. The brightly painted vertical beams are arranged in three concentric circles as a dimensional mandala, associated with wholeness and healing. As a viewer moves to the center, they will find themselves reflected in the beams' mirror surface, which creates a rhythmic fun house effect. The mandala pattern will also yield sound effects as visitors run their fingers along the carefully placed beams. These flickers, shimmers and sounds activate sensory experiences which are intended to bring viewers back to their own center.
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Rosemont Park | Fabrication | Virginia Fleck | 1400 W. Seminary Street
Local artist / landscape architect team Etty Horowitz and Kevin Sloan have revised their original design for the I-30 site to fit the new State Highway 121 site. Included are brick pavers, to be donated by Acme Brick, as a visual reference to the "Old Road to the West"; abundantly planted native Texas wildflowers and grasses, and large-scale Corten steel letters that spell out "Fort Worth". The new site on westbound State Highway 121 in the north right-of-way median (west of Maxine Street and east of Beach Street) offers dramatic views of the downtown Fort Worth skyline and is located just inside the Fort Worth City Limits as drivers approach downtown from the northeast and Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport.
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SH 121 Art and Landscape Project | Final Design | Etty Horowitz and Kevin Sloan | State Highway 121 at Maxine Street
FWPA is working with the District 9 Office to assemble a Project Core Team for a new public art project addressing the South Main Underpass near downtown Fort Worth. Funding for this project was included in the Public Art Plan for the 2014 Bond Program.
artists website
South Main Underpass | Planning | Artist TBD |
During Gordon Huether's micro-residency, he learned that one of the officers' main goals is to be recognized as members of the community. To support that goal, the Fort Worth Police Department is actively working to strengthen its relationship to the community. The Preliminary Design includes a sculpture which serves as a metaphor for the officers in blue lifting up the community which is symbolized by the mirror-finished stainless-steel sphere. Commanding yet welcoming, the piece is imagined as a bridge, making two become one.
artists website
South Patrol Division | Final Design | Gordon Huether + Partners, Inc. | McCart Avenue and W. Risinger Road
Huckaby's artwork for the traffic triangle at Ramey and Stalcup in Council District 5 will reflect the history of Stop Six. The artwork entitled "The Last Train" is designed to look like a train stop. Transforming the green space into a gathering place, it will feature a reproduction of a vintage Interurban train car, painted a shimmering golden color, resting on a track on a paved plaza. Figuresâ€...¡ abstracted portraits of members of the community, will be painted onto the side of the train. During the evening, the car will be illuminated from within, giving it a warm glow. The artist intends the train car symbolize a type of spiritual chariot that has come to take earthly citizens to a heavenly place.
artists website
Stop Six Triangle | Fabrication | Sedrick Huckaby | Ramey and Stalcup Intersection
Jill Bedgood's prairie-themed mile markers designed for Summer Creek Drive will complement the artist's public artwork at nearby Chisholm Trail Park, Art + Knowledge, which honors the ancestry of the land and celebrates natural prairie ecosystems: geology, hydrology, and flora and fauna. Using some of the highly detailed, full-color original drawings created by the artist for Chisholm Trail Park, each of the thirteen (13) mile markers will highlight one natural element from the surrounding environment. Placed in the grass along the sidewalk every quarter (0.25) mile, the markers will serve as a visual reference to pedestrians along the approximately 3-mile journey along Summer Creek Drive from McPherson Boulevard to Altamesa Boulevard.
artists website
Summer Creek | Fabrication | Jill Bedgood |
Artist Karla Garcia's design is inspired by migration and the natural landscape. Garcia chose to reimagine the dandelion, which is known as a wide spreading seed flower. Transforming the distinct "T-shape" clusters of the plant, the proposed sculpture includes instead a series of cattle horns that create a sense of repetition and movement. The resulting larger-than-life mirrored stainless-steel sculpture becomes a symbol of the legacy and history of the area while reflecting today's community as one. The design's reflectivity is intended to create interest from afar while connecting to viewers directly up close.
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Trail Drivers Park | Final Design | Karla Garcia | Trail Driver's Park
The Final Design for the Universal Playground at North Park is inspired by the universal symbols of bells and trees: bells provide solace and signify a time for fellowship; trees represent spiritual nourishment, growth, and strength. Listening Trees is a series of interactive musical sculptures created with colorful brass funnels, bells, and wind chimes. Each work will naturally resonate and amplify the sounds of both added elements and the natural soundscape of the park.
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Universal Playground (North Park) | Final Design | Steve Parker | North Park
The City of Fort Worth is currently having significant community conversations regarding racial equity in our city. In response to a citizen's concerns regarding the depiction of African-Americans in the 1936 mural on the facade of the Will Rogers Memorial Center Auditorium (section depicted above), a committee has been formed to provide insight on the addition of thoughtful, on-site interpretative information for viewers.
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Will Rogers Memorial Center Historic Tile Murals | Planning | Herman P. Koeppe | Ceramic tile | Will Rogers Memorial Center
 
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