ART IN PROGRESS | Creating Works that Resonate

Fort Worth Public Art has a host of diverse projects underway in various stages of the public art process including, planning, artist selection, preliminary design, final design, fabrication and installation, which are each listed in alphabetical order by the site name.

Coming soon!  A link to our Quarterly Project Status Report with more details on each project will be added to this page.

In response to the Project Core Team's interest in artwork that acts as a landmark, artist Anitra Blayton design acts as a symbol of harmony and positivity. Inspired by the wetland and patterns of organisms in the environment, including footprints of visitors which become one with the ecosystem, Blayton proposes a larger-than-life hummingbird appearing to drink water. The mirrored stainless steel faceted bird will have a series of five wings on each side detailed with laser cut shoe treads submitted by community members that together mimic the wings' rotation. Including the blue conical water shape, the sculpture will stand 24' tall and just over 24' at its widest point.
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Alliance Park | Fabrication | Anitra Blayton | Alliance Park
Ciardiello and Randall's goal is to create engaging and beautiful pieces of sculptural artwork to captivate the interest of area residents. The team's Preliminary Design combines three important natural elements of the area suggested by residents: native flora, dramatic skies, and remarkable storms. Utilizing the median light poles, the sculptures are designed to be viewed from all angles, existing in a playful space between abstraction and representation. The design addresses 16-24 poles along Chapel Creek Boulevard from White Settlement Road to Old Weatherford Road.
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Chapel Creek Corridor | Final Design | SV Randall and Brenda Ciardiello |
This public art project associated with the 2022 Bond Program. The park's master plan suggests that the artwork may be integrated into or near the entrance retaining wall of the park, within the Zamarripa baseball fields plaza, and/or integrated into the park memorial adjacent to the Worth Heights Community Center. The Project Core Team discussed their interest in an artwork that addresses the community and park history in an interactive way, reflective of Mr. Vasquez’s shared vision for the park which includes family value, pride, and unity.
artists website
Ciquio Vasquez Park | Preliminary Design | J. Muzacz |
This sculpture will transform a civil rights-era bus into a public artwork that connects the struggle for equal rights and justice from a national narrative to a local one, highlighting connections between the two. Aluminum panels within the bus shell will focus on Willis Pace - Fort Worth's first black city bus driver, Montgomery Bus Boycott, Freedom Riders, and Desegregation Bussing. Additional panels will feature the Lenora Rolla Center, Grand Theater, Baker Chapel, and Ella Mae Shamblee Library, as "stops" and all play key roles in telling the area's story.
artists website
East Rosedale Street (I 35 - 287) | Fabrication | Christopher Blay | Repurposed Transit Bus | I-35W to US287
As part of the 2018 Bond Program, the City of Fort Worth has completed pavement improvements along Eastchase Parkway. The Project Core Team expressed interest in an artwork that is beautiful, stands out with vibrancy, and exudes positive energy.
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Eastchase Parkway | Artist Selection | TBD | Eastchase Parkway and Meadowbrook Boulevard
A new public art project associated with improvements made to Eugene McCray Community Center as part of the 2014 Bond Program.
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Eugene McCray Community Center | Artist Selection | Artist TBD |
The City of Fort Worth is designing and building a new branch library in far northwest Fort Worth. The new building will be located on the south side of Avondale-Haslet Road near the intersection of Austin Stone Drive (Sendera Ranch) in Council District 10. The Project Core Team discussed artwork that is interactive, tactile and encourages visitors to engage with it.
artists website
Far Northwest Library | Preliminary Design | Susan Narduli |
The City of Fort Worth is replacing existing Fire Station 16, which will be located near the current Fire Station 16 in Council District 3, and adjacent to Council District 6. Artwork will likely be incorporated into the building's exterior. This would ensure the artwork is visible from the intersection.
artists website
Fire Station #16 | Preliminary Design | Sarah Ayala |
Fire Station #26 is seen as a gateway between commercial and residential areas in this community. After spending 50 hours during a micro-residency with the firefighters, artist Julie Lazarus learned of the personal importance of the firefighters' helmet and its reputation as a "badge of honor." Her Final Design includes three series of helmets, each uniquely patterned, to represent the various personnel on each shift (A, B, and C) at the station. The helmets will be a combination of mirrored and brushed stainless steel. The work will be lit at night with an ultramarine blue colored light, echoing the color of the firefighters' trucks.
artists website
Fire Station #26 | Final Design | Julie Lazarus | Fire Station #26
A new public art project associated with improvements at the Handley-Meadowbrook Community Center as part of the 2014 Bond Program.
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Handley-Meadowbrook Community Center | Artist Selection | Artist TBD |
A new public art project associated with 2014 Bond improvements at Heritage Park.
artists website
Heritage Park | Preliminary Design | Legge Lewis Legge |
This public art project is associated with the 2018 Bond Program provides an opportunity for an artist to create a unique, artistic experience along Horne Street near the intersections of Libbey Avenue and Humbert Avenue. The two neighborhood streets are separated by 0.1 mile (a 2-minute walk). Overall, the participatory artwork should be highly visible from a distance, create a layered experience, and connect the present-day diverse community to the area's roots. The artwork is expected to echo the vibrancy of Horne Street's past while reflecting the 24-hour life of today's Como "Main Street."
artists website
Horne Street | Preliminary Design | Darryl Ratcliff |
Lyrical Strands celebrates Fort Worth's Rosedale neighborhood as an epicenter of rich African American cultural history and community by creating a sense of place and dramatic arrival. Inspired by the Southside's once flourishing music scene and the embrace of Adinkra cultural symbols come together to give a unique narrative identity to the Rosedale area.
artists website
I-35/Rosedale | Final Design | RE:Site |
Entitled Right Turn Only, Reigelman's artwork is a vortex of condensed traffic arrows spiral in on themselves and twirl upward toward the sky. Drawing upon the roundabout's cyclical motion, the playful artwork nods to the directional signage that will be part of the roundabout and acknowledges the rich aeronautical history found in the community. The overall spiraling form acts as a traditional symbol of growth, rebirth and ascension. Comprised of hundreds of bright blue steel and aluminum arrows, the artwork is poised to become a bold and whimsical landmark for this re-emerging community.
artists website
Las Vegas Trail | Fabrication | Mark Reigelman | Las Vegas Trail and Normandale Street
Artist Clifton Crofford's Final Design for West Magnolia Avenue includes three sculptures composed of bronze and glass: an acorn, a pinecone, and a magnolia seed pod. The imagery of seeds symbolizes the potential of the community and its residents to work together for future generations. Possible sites for the sculptures include the intersections of S. Henderson Street, 5th Avenue, and/or Lake Street along the pedestrian-friendly Magnolia Avenue corridor, located in the Near Southside district.
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Magnolia Avenue | Fabrication | Clifton Crofford | Magnolia Avenue
Bajuyo's One Way and Eggert's A Very Long Now encourage the viewer to consider time as linear and endless, but also as cyclical. Each sculpture's placement and rhythmic quality via repetition of elements reinforces the aspect of time in the work. These sculptures and their relationship give form to the relative endlessness of time as memory and experience circle, loop, and overlap. The work highlights the artists' understanding of our place in time and the world.
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Marine Creek Parkway | Final Design | Curator Iris Bechtol, Artists Leticia Bajuyo and Alicia Eggert | Marine Creek Parkway (at Longhorn Road and Cromwelll-Marine Creek Road)
A new public art project along Meacham Boulevard from I-35W to Beach Street associated with the 2018 Bond Program. The Project Core Team has expressed an interest in an artwork that creates echoes movement through the corridor that includes reference to time.
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Meacham Corridor | Preliminary Design | Vicki Scuri | Meacham Corridor
The Preliminary Design for the underpass at North Beach and I-820 responds to the Project Core Team's interest in a gateway artwork that is bold and sparks intrigue. Merge Conceptual Design's series of bright colored "wind wheels" connect to the identity of the area and greater Fort Worth. With a total of 58 wheels made with bicycle components, the artwork will respond to the environmental elements of the site: wind passing through the underpass will push the wheels to spin at various speeds; and, light will illuminate the wheels' reflective surface, allowing tonal color shifts throughout the day.
artists website
N. Beach/820 Underpass | Fabrication | Merge Conceptual Design | I-820 Underpass at North Beach
Funds to construct the North Service, Drop-off, and Animal Care and Control Centers were included in the 2014 and 2018 Bond Programs. The public art funds for these facilities were combined to create a larger installation at the North Animal Control Center Campus where Julie Richey recently completed a series of mosaic sculptures. Since some funds remain, Richey will develop an artwork to serve as a way-finding element, helping citizens find the location and understand the purpose of the campus.
artists website
North Service Center | Preliminary Design | Julie Richey | North Service Center
Open Plains, a new public artwork designed by Matthew Mazzotta, seeks to bring the outdoors in by transposing a natural scene within the community center lobby. Creating a focal point for the new building, a large grassy berm creates unique seating while a small group of sculptural birds glide gently overhead in a circle, moving their wings as they float in the airspace. The playful artwork is intended to give the viewer the experience of connecting with the open landscape that surrounds the community center, which is nestled within Northwest Community Park.
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Northwest Community Center | Final Design | Matthew Mazzotta | Southeast Corner within Northwest Community Park
The Northwest Patrol Division Public Art Project is associated with the 2022 Bond Program. The Project Core Team expressed interest in an exterior artwork that would be visible at all hours of the day and readable by a wide array of visitors. They shared interest in an artwork that highlights the partnership between the community and the Fort Worth Police Department with a lens for diversity and inclusion.
artists website
Northwest Patrol Division | Preliminary Design | Project One Studio |
Known for their expertise in incorporating native plants and grasses into residential and commercial garden design, REDENTA'S Landscape Design, LLC proposal complements Eliseo Garcia's limestone sculpture Nature's Essence and fulfills goals in the Overton & Foster Park Master Plan. The plan creates context around the sculpture inviting park visitors to engage with the sculpture via a walkway plaza and seating for observing the sculpture and the ecology in a new wildflower zone. The design creates a natural gathering space around the sculpture and provides site lines from the nearby roadways.
artists website
Overton Park Phase II | Installation | Kinler Landscape Architecture | Landscape and hardscape | Overton Park
Artist Donna Dobberfuhl looked to Rosedale Street for the theme she has woven into enhancements along East Rosedale Street as part of the City's Polytechnic Heights Urban Village. Her large rose designs are carved directly into the brick that forms three kiosks spaced at intervals along East Rosedale Street across from the Texas Wesleyan University campus. Smaller groupings of roses in light colored cast stone adorn the low seating along East Rosedale Street directly in front of the university. A series of six metal plaques are currently in development, which will feature historic photographs from the community and will be installed onto the open sides of the three kiosks.
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Polytechnic / Wesleyan Urban Village | Pending | Donna Dobberfuhl | Polytechnic / Wesleyan Urban Village
As part of the 2022 Bond Program the City of Fort Worth is making improvements to Ray White Road, a major north south arterial in north Fort Worth in Council District 4. These improvements include widening a section of the roadway between Kroger Drive on the south and Big Bear Creek on the north, (south of Golden Triangle Boulevard), expanding from two to four lanes divided by a median. The existing roundabout lend themselves to a free standing artwork or series of artworks that would be primarily experienced by vehicular traffic.
artists website
Ray White Road | Artist Selection | TBD |
This project honors this heritage with a grand-scaled artwork visible throughout the park and to passers-by. The artwork acknowledges the trees by making an abstract representation of their root systems, buried within the soil, visible to park visitors. Depicted on the surface of the path that traverses the park, the artwork is a kind of imaginary x-ray through the ground, showing the intricate pattern of roots beneath it. The artists' aim is to call upon the cultural and natural histories of the Trinity River site, however, the artwork will also delight the eye with color and patterns that can be appreciated by all people regardless of their historical knowledge.
artists website
Riverside Park | Fabrication | Ball-Nogues Studio |
Local artist / landscape architect team Etty Horowitz and Kevin Sloan have revised their original design for the I-30 site to fit the new State Highway 121 site. Included are brick pavers, to be donated by Acme Brick, as a visual reference to the "Old Road to the West"; abundantly planted native Texas wildflowers and grasses, and large-scale Corten steel letters that spell out "Fort Worth". The new site on westbound State Highway 121 in the north right-of-way median (west of Maxine Street and east of Beach Street) offers dramatic views of the downtown Fort Worth skyline and is located just inside the Fort Worth City Limits as drivers approach downtown from the northeast and Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport.
artists website
SH 121 Art and Landscape Project | Fabrication | Etty Horowitz and Kevin Sloan | State Highway 121 at Maxine Street
Bill Fitzgibbons' conceptual proposal focuses on create an inviting and placemaking light sculpture that celebrates Fort Worth as well as the community in which it finds itself. The gateway artwork is expected to have ten to twelve unique light programs throughout the year.
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South Main Underpass | Final Design | Bill Fitzgibbons |
During Gordon Huether's micro-residency, he learned that one of the officers' main goals is to be recognized as members of the community. To support that goal, the Fort Worth Police Department is actively working to strengthen its relationship to the community. The Final Design includes a sculpture which serves as a metaphor for the officers in blue lifting up the community which is symbolized by the mirror-finished stainless-steel sphere. Commanding yet welcoming, the piece is imagined as a bridge, making two become one.
artists website
South Patrol Division | Fabrication | Gordon Huether + Partners, Inc. | McCart Avenue and W. Risinger Road
Huckaby's artwork for the traffic triangle at Ramey and Stalcup in Council District 5 will reflect the history of Stop Six. The artwork entitled "The Last Train" is designed to look like a train stop. Transforming the green space into a gathering place, it will feature a reproduction of a vintage Interurban train car, painted a shimmering golden color, resting on a track on a paved plaza. Abstracted portraits of members of the community will be painted onto the side of the train. During the evening, the car will be illuminated from within with a warm glow. The artist intends the train car symbolize a type of spiritual chariot that has come to take earthly citizens to a heavenly place.
artists website
Stop Six Triangle | Fabrication | Sedrick Huckaby | Ramey and Stalcup Intersection
Jill Bedgood's prairie-themed mile markers designed for Summer Creek Drive will complement the artist's public artwork at nearby Chisholm Trail Park, Art + Knowledge, which honors the ancestry of the land and celebrates natural prairie ecosystems: geology, hydrology, and flora and fauna. Using some of the highly detailed, full-color original drawings created by the artist for Chisholm Trail Park, each of the thirteen (13) mile markers will highlight one natural element from the surrounding environment. Placed in the grass along the sidewalk every quarter (0.25) mile, the markers will serve as a visual reference to pedestrians along the approximately 3-mile journey along Summer Creek Drive from McPherson Boulevard to Altamesa Boulevard.
artists website
Summer Creek | Fabrication | Jill Bedgood |
In response to the Core Team's interest in artwork to reflect the importance of creative play, education, and community building, artist Blessing Hancock proposes a figure-eight-like sculpture with curvilinear details that come together. The painted metal surface of the artwork will display colorful patterns that convey the action and movement of the recreational activities surrounding the piece. Bands with language collected from the community will be included. The theme of the language will revolve around the past, present and future dreams of visitors to the park.
artists website
Sycamore Park | Final Design | Blessing Hancock | 2400 W. Vickery Blvd
The City of Fort Worth is currently having significant community conversations regarding racial equity in our city. In response to a citizen's concerns regarding the depiction of African-Americans in the 1936 mural on the facade of the Will Rogers Memorial Center Auditorium (section depicted above), a series of interpretive plaques have been designed to provide insight on the addition of thoughtful, on-site interpretative information for viewers.
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Will Rogers Memorial Center Historic Tile Mural Plaques | Fabrication | Herman P. Koeppe | Bronze (Ceramic Tile Murals) | Will Rogers Memorial Center
 
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