FWPA COMMISSIONED COLLECTION | Commissioned by the City of Fort Worth 

As you explore each artwork commissioned by the City of Fort Worth through the Fort Worth Public Art program, you are seeing the tangible result of an artist’s dialogue with a specific site and the community, collaboration with design professionals (architects, landscape architects and/or engineers), and a culmination of many years of their own artistic practice.  The works below (starting with most recent) represent a moment in time in Fort Worth’s unique history and, collectively, reference the past, present and future of the city.

Learn about the commissioning process and how you can get involved.

Local Artist Kris Pierce designed a series of three permanent sculptural concrete plinths. These works will create an exterior gallery for temporary outdoor artworks, a new program of the Fort Worth Community Arts Center. Each plinth honors the spirit of the building's original Bauhaus-informed architecture by Principal Designer Herbert Bayer, whose 1925 universal alphabet served as inspiration for the plinths' minimal, balanced forms.
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Kris Pierce | Untitled (Plinths) | 2019 | Cast Concrete | Fort Worth Community Arts Center
Created in 2015, Vase With Nine Flowers was selected from among several outdoor sculptures by James Surls and acquired by the City through direct purchase. Standing 17 feet in height and over 6 feet in width, the bronze and stainless steel abstracted floral sculpture is in Surls' characteristic style. It provides an aesthetic and meaningful focal point along Montgomery Street - a gateway into the Cultural District, the Will Rogers Memorial Complex, and the new Dickies Arena.
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James Surls | Vase with Nine Flowers | 2019 | Bronze and Stainless Steel | Montgomery Street at Lansford Lane
Carousel is located in the roundabout at East Rosedale Street and Mitchell Boulevard. The beautiful artwork is in the form of a "carousel", with six large, colorful parrots - a reference to the mascot of nearby Polytechnic High School and the importance of education. Its theatrical quality references the Jubilee Theatre, which was originally established in this neighborhood, and the theatre department at Texas Wesleyan University (TWU). Designed as a stationary â€"carousel" meant to be experienced by motorists driving around it, the artwork serves as a metaphor for the circle of life.
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Jim Hirschfield and Sonya Ishii | Carousel | 2019 | Painted Aluminum and Steel | East Rosedale Roundabout at Mitchell
Artist Shawn Smith designed Burning Bright as a symbol for the city and its growth. The pixelated panther sculpture is installed on the walls in front of Fire Station 42. Instead of depicting the panther asleep as it is in the famous quote, Smith chose to depict it running with speed and purpose as a reflection of the firefighters and their remarkably fast response time. The tail end of the panther is heavily pixelated and broken into small fragmented pieces that gradually form together into the solid structure of the head of the panther. This was intended as a metaphor for the individual small towns in the area growing together to create a single community, moving forward with purpose and strength.
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Shawn Smith | Burning Bright | 2019 | Powder coated Steel | Fire Station #42
The Welcome Space, located at the Highland Hills Community Center, features two outdoor benches having the appearance of couches covered by quilts, welcoming visitors by seating them among the excellent patchwork of community members who have graced the neighborhood over the years. The artwork recalls the African American legacy of quilting and hand-made craft. The portraits feature people of different ages and genders and also includes other institutions commemorating the neighborhood's history and heritage.
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Sedrick Huckaby | The Welcome Space | 2019 | Mosaic Tile and Concrete | Highland Hills Community Center
Pieces of Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow, a multi-faceted painting by local artist Gregory Beck. Located at the East Division Police Station, the vibrant artwork is inspired by the spirit of East Fort Worth and its ties to, and influences on, the City. The overall work, comprised of 27 individual pieces and 8 large scale panels, illustrates a puzzle in progress. Each piece of the puzzle is inspired by East Fort Worth's historic relevance and cultural diversity, showing the evolution of the community in Handley-Meadowbrook.
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Gregory Beck | Pieces of Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow | 2018 | Steel and Automotive paint | E. Division Police Station
Located at the Bob Bolen Public Safety Complex, the sculpture is based on the shape of Fort Worth's Police and Fire Department patches, with two halves intersecting and supporting each other, expressing solidarity between the departments. Inside the large, curved forms, unique shapes of numerous patches collected by the Fort Worth Fire Department and Fort Worth Police Department are water-jet cut into 1 inch thick COR-TEN steel, creating an overall pattern that creates intricate shadow play on the plaza at the entrance to the Administration Building.
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Beliz Brother | As One | 2018 | Steel | Bob Bolen Public Safety Training Center
Zarape utilizes a representation of a human profile to convey the diversity of the community. At fifteen feet in height the sculpture is fabricated with metal tubing, cut to shape and powder coated. Inspired by the vibrant colors of the iconic Sarape blanket of Mexico, the artwork uses its hues to identify the uniqueness of ALL in the community. The sculpture can be viewed from four directions while its height allows visibility from Hemphill Road.
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Acknowledging flow patterns of the river below, four identical sculptures mark the East 1st Street Bridge as it passes over the West Fork of the Trinity River. Motion -- in water and air, or in any liquid or gas -- is expressed in a triad of twisting steel reeds mimicking the surrounding natural habitat. Each rising waveform sentinel reminds travelers of the relationship between man and nature, softening the urban experience and honoring the river's three essential branches running through North Texas.
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Ken Bernstein | Trinity | 2017 | Metal, LED light | East 1st Street Bridge
Urban Still Life melds abstracted historic graphic images and signage with contemporary materials to create a series of six light sculptures along the redeveloped mile-long South Main Street Urban Village Corridor. The artwork protects the historic integrity of the street while humanizing the pedestrian experience and adding a sense of playful modernity. Line drawings of familiar shapes and logos found along South Main are overlapped and cut from brushed stainless steel to become abstracted pattern. The larger than life works have an engaging presence, with a nostalgic sense that they could be waiting for a bus or a friend.
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Benito Huerta | Urban Still Life | 2017 | Stainless Steel | South Main Street, Vickery to Magnolia
"Collective Transition" explores the dynamics of social interaction as a result of shared physical space and imaginative experience. Lightheartedly referencing the function of "paperwork" in both work and play, Kobayashi demonstrates how we collectively impact, and are in turn impacted by, what occurs in physical space and our visual site lines. The whimsical formation's implied transformation, from natural birdlike shapes to classically, hand-folded paper planes to traditional aeronautic prototypes, is an extension of personal evolution and the fluidity and rhythms of conversation.
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Kipp Kobayashi | Collective Transitions | 2017 | Stainless steel | Meacham International Airport
Artist Julia Ousley designed a walking labyrinth inlaid with engraved granite plaques that name distinguished founders of the Historic Carver Heights Community, interwoven with plaques chronicling significant events of the Civil Rights Movement. At the center of the labyrinth are three steel towers of different heights topped with cutouts of men, women and children, symbolizing generations of the community standing on the shoulders of their ancestors. Smaller, symbolic house forms accompany the central sculpture. These vertical elements act as a marker and help to draw people to the site.
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Julia Ousley | The Ancestors | 2017 | Steel | Plaza Circle
Local artists' original images feature themes of transportation, reading, recreation, environmental stewardship, and the history of Fort Worth's east side are sited along East Lancaster Avenue on a series of street light boxes. Once a busy America highway, the historic thoroughfare was transformed into a grand avenue in the 1970’s and each scene nostalgically references the businesses that have impacted the surrounding community over the years. The modern stylization illustrates the ways that neighbors have optimistically embraced change.
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Various | East Lancaster Traffic Signal Control Cabinets | 2017 | E. Lancaster Avenue
Huerta's streetscape design for the Hemphill Berry Urban Village is influenced by the Craftsman-styled architecture found throughout the surrounding neighborhoods. Based on the American Arts and Crafts movement popular in the early 20th century, decorative detailing, simplified natural themes, and fine craftsmanship inform Huerta's functional aesthetic for the 27 pole banners along the intersection. She also provided design work for trash receptacles and public benches that populate the street.
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Leticia Huerta | Back to Nature | 2017 | Powder Coated Stainless Steel | Hemphill and Berry Street
Golden Assembly is inspired by a mathematical ratio called the Golden Section. Through repeating proportions generated by this ratio, Eley explores how original shapes can be infinitely expanded or divided without losing their core identity, creating a sense of harmony and balance. The installation employs this theme, along with a nostalgic use of color and careful siting beneath shade trees, to represent the dynamics and integrity of healthy family and community relationships.
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Eric Eley | Golden Assembly | 2016 | Stainless Steel and Colored Composite Lumber | Rosen Park
The historic Bomber Heights neighborhood's contribution to the aviation industry inspires Ekstrom's sculptural installation at Mary's Creek. Six carved limestone benches and a welcoming interpretive monument tell the story of the B-36 Bomber (the "Peacemaker") and the men and women that worked the production line at the nearby Vultee plant in 1945. More than 3,000 heavy bombers were produced at the Fort Worth plant. Situated on a community-walking path, "Lining up at Penrose" is mindful of the community's service to family and country.
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Ann Ekstrom | Lining Up at Penrose | 2016 | Limestone | South Z Boaz Park
The artwork is comprised of four insulated glass units composed of tempered ultra-clear glass, set into the existing window wall for the north elevation of the building. Twelve symmetrical keyboard symbols in gold leaf are set against varied bright translucent colors. Abstract, but also like stained glass, these windows complement an existing, similar artwork in the library by the same artist that consists of the symmetrical letters of the alphabet. While that artwork is located in the reading area, this new piece is adjacent to the computer workstation area. The symbols used reflect this difference.
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Sandra Fiedorek | Some Keys | 2016 | Colored Laminated Glass, Gold Leaf | Northwest Branch Library
Scattered along the system of trails that surround Marine Creek, these historic markers remind bikers, joggers, and trail users of the legendary Chisholm Trail, and the herds, sometimes ten thousand cattle at a time, that once were driven north through Fort Worth. Because the park also features preserved wetlands and ecosystem education element, the artist also added fencing designs in the shape of indigenous birds- a red shouldered hawk and a belted kingfisher.
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Benito Huerta | Marine Creek Park Corridor Enhancements and Markers | 2015 | Steel | Marine Creek Park
Two animated "ammonite fossils" mark the entry points of the Fossil Creek Bridge. A testament of the rich ecological history found in North Texas river and creek beds, the sculptures are a playful reminder of the challenges of urban development and community growth. Stanley's skilled ironwork and color choice identifies the connection between two communities and with the past.
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Lars Stanley | Ammonite Intervention | 2015 | Painted Steel | North Riverside Drive over Fossil Creek
"Memory: Fairmount Park" is a visual reference to the historic neighborhood fabric. Six houses once occupied the block at Myrtle and Henderson, but were removed to make way for the park in 1990, shortly before the area was named a national historic district. To evoke the memory of the missing homes, their house numbers were cast in bronze and installed along the curb. Three sculptural tables re-create steps and porches, which were traditional gathering spaces for neighbors and friends. Basalt gravel paths echo the memory of sidewalks that used to lead up to the houses that once occupied the block.
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Bart Shaw | Memory: Fairmount Park | 2015 | Solid Surface, Massaranduba Wood, Steel and Basalt | Fairmount Park
Rooted in historic narrative and childhood memory, Train celebrates the late nineteenth and early twentieth century steam-era locomotives that roared through east Fort Worth and were largely responsible for the development of Handley, Texas. Set on end, the stylized engine, tender, and passenger cars act as a powerful metaphor for community identity. Handley, now a national historic district, became part of the City of Fort Worth in 1946.
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Wind Roundabout is the first-of-its-kind, free-standing piece created by artist Ned Kahn. It was commissioned by the City of Fort Worth through the Fort Worth Public Art program for the Panther Island Bridges project, part of the Trinity River Vision Master Plan. Thousands of small anodized aluminum hinged plates hang from tension cables on a 30 foot tall by 30 foot diameter stainless steel support structure, moving with the ever-changing direction and force of wind in Fort Worth.
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Ned Kahn | Wind Roundabout | 2015 | Steel and aluminum | Henderson Street Roundabout
An installation of mosaics on six bridge monuments and ten columns mark historic natural habitats and water crossings along the Chisholm Trail Parkway. Images of native water fowl and water-related creatures found in the Trinity River water shed by local photographers are stylistically reinterpreted by Sato as a thoughtful conversation about how the environmental is impacted by progress and development. Each column is capped with a water-related object while the bridge monuments act as majestic gateway markers into and out of downtown Fort Worth.
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Norie Sato | Water Crossing Markers and Trinity Water Fowls | 2015 | Cut Glass and Stone Mosaic | Chisholm Trail Parkway
Ocean of Grass is a celebration of the native prairie in Southwest Fort Worth. Horowitz' integration of stainless-steel rods, bent, curved, and intertwined into the building's facade, alludes to the diverse tall grasses that majestically intermingle in the landscape. Thee daytime sun reflects subtly one the building's modern, monochromatic entrance but shifts dramatically at night with uplighting, highlighting the joining of art and architecture.
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Etty Horowitz | Ocean of Grass | 2014 | Stainless Steel | Chisholm Trail Recreation Center
Themes of growth and nature extend down the length of West Rosedale Avenue in these ten sculptural lamp pole banners. Native flowers and grasses like primrose, honeysuckle and trout lily are stylized into Art Deco inspired designs that reference nearby buildings and historic significance of the area. The dichroic glass inserts bend light, creating a dazzling color changing effect when motorists drive by on the roadway and as the sun moves across the sky.
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Juan and Patricia Navarrete | Florescence | 2014 | Powder Coated Steel and Dichoric Glass | West Rosedale
Consequently is a memorial mosaic commemorating the life and contributions of Ms. Hazel Harvey Peace. Peace was an influential community leader and teacher whose service to community was marked by her life-long love for knowledge and education. Styled as a mandala (a configuration of spiritual symbols) McIntire uses a repetitive circular motif as a tool for introspection and plays off the name "Peace" as a classic metaphor for the powerful spirit and gentle nature embodied by her subject. Ms. Peace died in 2008 at the age of 100.
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Tina McIntire | Consequently | 2014 | Glass Mosaic | Hazel Harvey Peace Center for Neighborhoods
In celebration of the historic cattle drives of Fort Worth, Dewey Street Bridge features imagery drawn from the clothing and objects of cowboys and cowgirls, whose lifestyles revolved around the use and care of horses. Leatherworking motifs from saddles and boots are cast into the concrete bridge in subtle bas-relief. The five pointed star, a treasured emblem of the Lone Star State, is integrated into mosaic medallions on the sidewalk, carefully oriented towards a future hike and bike trail nearby.
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Leticia Huerta | Leather Roses and Stars | 2014 | Mosaic Tile and Concrete | Dewey Street Bridge
Artist Tommy Fitzpatrick designed this simple but elegant silhouette, which is installed on three facades of the Crime Laboratory tower. The organic forms and lyrical lines of the designs were inspired by the trout lily, a wildflower that grew abundantly in the prairies that once covered this region of Texas. Moving upwards through the floral shapes are three vertical lines referencing the interurban rail line that was once a vital part of the Lancaster corridor.
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Oxbow Traces depicts an aerial view of the natural and built environments surrounding the historic Edward's Ranch and the Clear Fork branch of the Trinity River. Overlaying the historic onto the contemporary, the composition maps the course of the river both before and later it was channelized in the 1960s as a flood control project. By illustrating the continued presence of the pastoral within the expanding urban environment, the mural conveys the dual nature of the modern landscape.
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Tommy Fitzpatrick | Oxbow Traces | 2013 | Automotive Paint on Aluminum | Clearfork Main Street Bridge
Trailing the Trinity shows the course of the Trinity River juxtaposed with images of life on the waterway. The triptych traces the route through the historic Edwards Ranch, along the popular hike and bike trail, and into the city center. Thee cowboy's lasso encircles the location of the artwork and the merging of the Clear Fork with the West Fork branches is shown at the kayaker's elbow, marking downtown Fort Worth. The river overlay unites the panels and underscores that the river's strength comes from the unity of its past, present, and future.
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Devon Nowlin | Trailing the Trinity | 2013 | Automotive Paint on Aluminum | Clearfork Main Street Pedestrian Bridge
Service through the Centuries is a three-part panoramic history of the Evans and Rosedale neighborhood told in fifty year increments. Progressing from the late nineteenth to the early twenty-first century, the compositions captures the changes in architecture, technology, and uniform styles that have taken place around Station #5, including three historic fire station buildings. The murals' increasingly saturated colors allude to modernization, while the benches' shades of blue reference water as an enduring firefighting tool.
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Oscar Alvarado | Service Through the Centuries | 2013 | Glass tile mural | Fire Station #5
Elizabeth Tower symbolizes of the history of Ryan Place Neighborhood. Located in a traffic circle, the work is inspired by grand limestone gates that mark the entrance to the Elizabeth Boulevard Historic District. Local Fort Worth artist Alice Bateman, who works in both steel and granite, designed and fabricated the steel sculpture to resemble the lustrous stone. At night, the elegant sculpture softly illuminates the intersection.
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Alice Bateman | Elizabeth Tower | 2013 | Painted Steel | Elizabeth Blvd.
Dreams at 100 Fathoms depicts a swimmer's underwater view bathed in sunlight. Abstracted patterns and a kaleidoscope of color allude to the duality of memory and imagination, evoking the creative potential associated with childhood games and activities.
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Ken OToole | Dreams at 100 Fathoms | 2013 | Glass and Ceramic Tile | Marine Park Pool
Local artist Michael Pavlovsky designed this series of twenty four sculptural panels as colorful, graphic anecdotes of the bustling activity happening in this vibrant and busy neighborhood along East Lancaster Avenue. Some designs celebrate the work of individuals at nearby police stations, public transportation hubs, churches, and homeless shelters, but scattered within this narrative are renderings of native animals and plants, adding a lyrical and organic touch to the streetscape.
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Michael Pavlovsky | Avenue Tapestry | 2013 | Powder coated aluminum | E. Lancaster Ave
Trout Lily Clock captures the notion of time and transience. The sculpture's form emulates the Trout Lily flower whose annual blossoming at the nearby Tandy Hills Natural Area signals the start of spring. The clock dangling from the flower's pistil acts as a timekeeper for one of Fort Worth's busiest transportation hubs. By merging form and function, the sculpture's poetic utility complements the intersection of natural and man-made worlds.
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Jack Mackie | Trout Lily | 2013 | Painted Steel and Clock | Fort Worth East Side Transfer Center
Encouraging viewers to consider the quilt as a story-telling device and a reminder of the comforts of home, Urban Quilt is a sculptural re-invention of the traditional and well-loved art from. The imagery is lifted straight from the neighborhood surrounding Berry and Riverside Urban Village's brick houses, grassy parks, industrial signage, fences, and wrought-iron weaving a nostalgic narrative of familiar patterns that also adds a touch of bold, modern design to the area.
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Montage 48/61 | Urban Quilt | 2013 | Laminated Polycarbonate | Berry Riverside Urban Village
Symbolic of diversity and community spirit, a triptych of brightly colored quill-topped shafts refer to the Arlington Heights community and the histories of Hi Mount Elementary School. The wind-activated central banner rotates with the prevailing breeze representing time's passage and the transitory nature of neighborhood growth and change. Significant dates are embedded on the tops of two flanking limestone benches.
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David Hickman | Thomas Place Tower | 2012 | Painted Steel, Aluminum, Concrete, Glass Tile | Thomas Place Community Center
Inspired by the cowboy culture of Fort Worth's historic Northside and the tools, clothing, and ornamentation that represent it, Embroidery Dreams features traditional Mexican embroidery work in a series of colorful glass tile murals, sidewalk medallions and detailed relief work on the NE 28th Street Bridge. The artist's use of floral, geometric and animal motifs softens the urban profile of the bridge and celebrates the diverse neighborhood's large Latino population and Charro roots, both important goals for the community and the city.
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Leticia Huerta | Embroidery Dreams | 2012 | Glass, Ceramic Tile | 1404 NE 28th Street
The two-part installation includes an oil on linen painting in the lobby, and a glass mosaic at the entrance to the building. The compositions investigate the formal qualities of water, including both transparency and mutable color. They are composed of geometric forms that visually fluctuate amidst changing ambient light. Apropos to a state-of-the-art water filtration and purification plant, the pieces convey a luminous quality that ties their formal character to the physical features of water.
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Julie Lazarus | Membrane Technology:Sources/Filtration | 2012 | Glass Tile | Westside Water Treatment Plant
The two-part installation includes an oil on linen painting in the lobby, and a glass mosaic at the entrance to the building. The compositions investigate the formal qualities of water, including both transparency and mutable color. They are composed of geometric forms that visually fluctuate amidst changing ambient light. Apropos to a state-of-the-art water filtration and purification plant, the pieces convey a luminous quality that ties their formal character to the physical features of water.
artists website
Julie Lazarus | Membrane Technology:Sources/Filtration (Painting) | 2012 | Acrylic on Canvas | Westside Water Treatment Plant
Vaquero de Fort Worth pays homage to the economic and cultural contributions of the Mexican cattle-herders whose traditions gave rise to western cowboys as we know them today. An authentic look at the vaquero's nomadic way of life, this sculpture includes historically accurate details carefully rendered in bronze. As a community initiated project, Vaquero de Fort Worth was the result of collaboration between the artists and dedicated local foundations, businesses, and individuals interested in commemorating and preserving Hispanic history.
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Tomas Bustos and David Newton | Vaquero | 2012 | Bronze | N. Main Street
Love Story features a cowboy hero, a lovelorn gymnast, and a diverse cast of supporting characters in a three-part narrative inspired by Fort Worth's nickname "City of Cowboys and Culture." The artist theatrically layered symbols of the community's diversity, cultural heritage and involvement in the arts. As part of the project, Michael Kirby conducted a workshop with Safe City Youth who painted a portable mural that was displayed inside the community center.
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Michael William Kirby | Love Story | 2012 | Painted Mural | Southwest Recreation Center
This series of mosaic murals illustrate the iconic individuals and events that represent the spirit of Fort Worth’s western heritage. Based on historic photographs from local archives, the murals collectively portray talent, bravery, and cultural diversity, and complement the nearby Art Deco architecture of Will Rogers Memorial Center buildings.
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Mike Mandell | Western Heritage Parking Garage Murals | 2012 | Glass and Porcelain Tile | Western Heritage Parking Garage
Reining, Soapsuds, Wimpy, Arabian, Paints, Appaloosa, and Cutting. Continuing Fort Worth's long equestrian tradition, award-winning breeds and exhibitions of expert horsemanship are on display at the Will Rogers Memorial Center each year during the popular Stock Show and Rodeo. Displayed on the exterior of the Center, this series of murals features four distinguished breeds and portraits of Wimpy, the first registered American Quarter Horse, and Soapsuds, Will Roger's own beloved horse.
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Mike Mandell | Western Heritage Murals | 2012 | Glass and Porcelain Tiles | Will Rogers Memorial Center - Equestrian Building
Artist Frances Bagley and Tom Orr's artwork for Fire Station 27 grew out of their conversations with the fire fighters, who suggested the artwork might represent an aspect of how they solve their challenge of fire fighting. Consequently, the artists chose the concept of water as an element fire fighters use to conquer fire. The sculpture represents an undulating cascade of water, crafted out of steel rod. Appearing like a gracefully arcing fountain, the repetition of vertical lines creates an effect as you move around the sculpture; the work is meant to inspire both the fire fighters at station #27 and the people of the surrounding community.
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Tom Orr & Francis Bagley | Cascading Water | 2012 | Powercoated Steel | Fire Station #27
The five ascending rings of light integrated into the Rolling Hills Radio Tower over three hundred feet in the air were inspired by the classic RKO Radio Pictures trademark - the most recognizable and compelling symbol of communications technology during the Golden Age of Hollywood. The rotating color palettes represent colors found in nature and coincide with the changing seasons. On the 4th of July, a celebration in red, white and blue illuminates the tower.
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Connie Aresmendi & Laura Garanzuay | Night Song | 2010 | Light | Rolling Hills Water Treatment Facility
Themes of non-violence and personal responsibility are narrated in Manuel Publido's two-part mural inspired by a multi-cultural folktale. The progressive unveiling of the starry sky, representing metamorphic change, begins the illustrated tale of Chan Luum, daughter of the great creator, who learns to care for the natural world only after a self-reckoning experience darkens the sky.
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Manuel Pulido | Rebirth of Aspiration | 2010 | Painted Mural | Northside Community Center
Using the silhouettes of local community members, Blue Lines celebrates the Shakespearean depiction of the seven stages of life from infancy to old age in the seven layers of concentric rings. Each faithfully rendered silhouette illustrates community unity, continuity and collective history. Defined by crisp blue LED lighting, the sculpture pays homage to the police force as the vital membrane protecting and maintaining civil society.
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Ralph Helmick | Blue Lines | 2010 | Powder coated steel | Fort Worth Police Department
Nature's Essence combines form and texture in the hand-carved monolith inspired by native flora and fauna. Employing a mythic journey narrative, Eliseo Garcia illustrates the elemental and imaginative forces that shape and transform the earth. The inclusion of marine and land creatures, patterns resembling moving water, fossilized forms, and plant life refer to the rich and varied geological history of North Texas.
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Eliseo Garcia | Nature's Essence | 2010 | Limestone | Overton Park
Prairie Wind nostalgically recalls the natural environment once found in the North Texas prairie. The allegorical female figure, representing the romantic notion of the promise of a prairie wind, references the healing power of Mother Earth. Representational images of animals and multitudes of native plants ornament the base and offer a learning opportunity to park visitors.
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Michael Pavlosvky | Prairie Wind | 2010 | Bronze | CP Hadley Park
Taking its title from a work by the poet Langston Hughes, Freedom Train honors the contributions of African American railroad workers. Located inside the 1931 Texas & Pacific Terminal, a historic water fountain and bench accompany Gottfried's stainless steel silhouette timeline representing the African American experience from the days of segregation to the present. Embellished bronze plaques provide historic context and tell the story of State Representative Garfield Thompson, a former dining car waiter on the Burlington-Rock Island Railroad.
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Jeff Gottfried | Freedom Train | 2010 | Stainless Steel, Bronze | Fort Worth T&P Station Building
Assembled from glass tiles , this mosaic depicts the native bird and plant life of the North Texas grasslands. The mural's emphasis on pattern and texture creates a theatrical presentation that unites scientific illustration with artistic interpretation. Native flora including Yucca and Brown-Eyed Susan are paired with fauna such as the Blue Jay and Mockingbird. The indigenous life is represented in an expressive manner and ultimately alludes to the tenuous balance between natural habitat and urban development.
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Billy Hassell | Birds and Flora of Texas | 2010 | Glass Mosaic | Fire Station #34
Eleven art-glass windowpanes illuminated with gold leaf, symmetrical letters are seamlessly integrated into the architectural space of the library. Reminiscent of medieval manuscripts, the characters allude to the power of the written word. As light passes through the glass, jewel-toned shadows of the signs and colored panels transform the interior space into an vibrant environment and capitalize on the lasting power of the written word.
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Sandra Fiedorek | Letters | 2010 | Colored Laminated Glass, Gold Leaf | Northwest Branch Library
The total installation of colored glass, sculpture, and sound within the parking garage calls attention to the aesthetic experiences of the everyday. The site-specific work incorporates the chevron designs of the city's Art Deco and Moderne style buildings, as well as the voices of local news commentators, celebrities, and wildlife. Through an immersive experience, commonplace sights and sounds become a complex orchestra that transforms garage patrons into artistic participants.
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PhenomenArts, Inc. | Parking in Color | 2009 | Glass, Light, Audio | Downtown Fort Worth Houston Street Parking Garage
Hand carved from a sixty-ton red granite block over the course of two years, Earth Fountain is the centerpiece of Byers Green. The three openings perpendicular to three surrounding conjoining streets reference the local built environment while the interior carving illustrates the watershed of the Trinity River - carved to scale one foot equaling one mile - drawing attention to the transformative power of water as it flows and returns to the earth.
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Philippe Klinefelter | Earth Fountain | 2009 | Granite | Byers Green
Composed of stacked, laser-cut stainless plates, Avenue of Light draws inspiration from the zigzag motifs on the nearby facades of the Texas & Pacific Terminal and Warehouse buildings. Spanning the half mile length of Lancaster Avenue, these six sculptures honor the past with the use of contemporary forms and materials. To celebrate annual events and special occasions, the towers are illuminated at night in different colors.
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Cliff Garten | Avenue of Light | 2009 | Stainless Steel | Lancaster Avenue
A pair of seven-foot high, high relief cast stone panels illustrates the valor and strength exemplified by firefighters in the performance of their jobs. The artist's depiction of firefighter's in full, uniform underscore the Department's motto, "to serve and protect"and the historic helmet depicting the cross of Saint Florian, the patron saint of firefighters, and the words "Courage" and "Vigilance" symbolize duty to community.
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Janice Hart Melito | Our Heroes | 2008 | Cast Stone | Fort Worth Fire Station #41
Friends for Life articulates the intimate and mutually rewarding bond that is possible between animals and humans. Alice Bateman, a local North Texas artist and ardent animal lover, created this functional artwork that also serves as a much-needed outdoor enclosure at the Fort Worth Animal Care and Control Center, providing a safe and natural way for adopters to meet potential animal companions.
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Alice Bateman | Friends for Life | 2008 | Steel | Fort Worth Animal Care and Control Center
Letitia Huckaby's installation reflects the heritage of the Evans & Rosedale neighborhood and the Fort Worth-based artist's exploration of genealogy, history, and themes of family and community. The window design, inspired by traditional African-American patchwork quilts, combines Huckaby's contemporary portraits, historic photographs and blocks of colored glass, visually linking past and present. A mosaic "river" of tile and stone winds through the library from the entrance patio to the literary garden becoming a metaphor for the journey of life and continuity of traditions.
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Letitia Huckaby | 35 City Blocks | 2008 | Digitally printed laminated glass (window) Stone and tile mosaic (patio/floor) | Ella Mae Shamblee Library
Chroma Refraction consists of forty-six glass roundels suspended beneath a skylight. By manipulating glass material and natural light, the installation incorporates changing atmospheric conditions to create a total environmental experience. The roundels explore the potential of translucent material, chromatic variation, and geometric shape. Light penetrating the glass transforms the open lobby into a colored environment. Shifting atmospheric conditions affect the appearance of the roundels and the nature of the colored light, ultimately resulting in an ever-fluctuating architectural space.
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David Keens | Chroma Refraction | 2008 | Glass | Northpark YMCA
Man's relationship with water is the subject of the multi-part installation at the anterior of the Fire Station. The piece is composed of limestone seating, a drinking fountain, and drought tolerant plants. Text sandblasted into the stone and cast onto the bronze bowls conveys information regarding water usage in Tarrant County, and the limestone benches visualize the amount of water used daily by the average American. The installation makes tangible the critical nature of man's relationship with water.
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Cam Schoepp | Water Fountain | 2008 | Limestone | Fort Worth Fire Station 38
Monumental spurs and decorative leather belts transport visitors of the Historic Stockyards into the legendary world of cattle drives and the old west. An immersive experience, Rodeo Plaza also includes artistic elements integrated into seating and architecture throughout the street - reminders of the industry that built Fort Worth - horseshoes, cowboy boots, and cattle brands, each inspiring images of ranchers and cattlemen driving their steers through the stockyards.
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Steve Teeters | Rodeo Plaza: Legacy of the Land | 2008 | Various Metals | Rodeo Plaza, Historic Stockyards
This bright and colorful pair of mosaics on Chickering Road are a legacy of the historic curbside street signs in early Fort Worth. Their designs reflect Fort Worth artist Devon Nowlin's talent in integrating pattern, decoration, and elements of the natural world. In the summer, the mosaics echo and enhance the verdant lawns of the neighborhood, while in the winter their bright green color promises the coming spring.
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Devon Nowlin | Green Grass Mosaic | 2008 | Glass | Chickering Road
Arranged from individually designed ceramic tiles, Stampede employs bold contour lines, vibrant colors, and graphic details that depict Texas longhorns. The mural alludes to an aspect of the region's history while simultaneously suggesting progress. Installed in an area once dominated by the agriculture and livestock industry, the mural visually suggests the region's rich history. Concurrently, it evinces the expanding municipality of Fort Worth and the concomitant civic buildings that protect the residents of the city.
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Montage 48/61 | Stampede | 2008 | Ceramic | Fort Worth Fire Station 11
Depicting residents from the Evans/Rosedale neighborhood engaged in healthy outdoor activities, For Better Life is a representative of Floyd Newsum's animated painting style and underscores the value â€" and fun" of family and community engagement. Each of the vibrant, cheery scenes supports the values of excellence and fair play, themes modeled by Hazel Harvey Peace, the important African American educator and community activist for whom the Center is named.
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Floyd Newsum, Jr. | For Better Life | 2008 | Painted Aluminum | Hazel Harvey Peace Center for Neighborhoods
At the turn of the twentieth century, Fort Worth was home to the largest livestock market in the Southwest and the Ã'¢â‚¬Ã...â€"Cowtown" legend became embedded in the city's identity. A longhorn affectionately named "Molly" emerged as the City's official mascot, commemorating the cattle industry's impact on the City's commerce and growth. The sturdy, independent, and highly-adaptable breed has come to symbolize Fort Worth's spirit.
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Rebecca Low | Molly | 2007 | Copper | Fort Worth City Hall
Drawing from the aesthetic history of Fort Worth, Mark Fields uses the same colors of early curbside street sign mosaics - blue and white. The addition of red tiles and the undulating pattern alludes to the presence of nearby Southwest Boulevard (Texas State Highway 183) which linked workers' neighborhoods to the General Dynamics plant, known for manufacturing one of the world's most popular jet fighter: the F-16 Fighting Falcon.
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Mark Fields | Piedmont | 2007 | Glass Mosaic | Piedmont Road
Twelve pairs of bronze boots historic three-quarter fire boots realistically painted are sited at the entrance of the station and compliment text in the windows of the station's tower.
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Eric McGehearty | United We Stand | 2006 | Bronze with Painted Patina | Fort Worth Fire Station # 8
Early Texas describes the expansive and entrepreneurial spirit of the artist's home state. Early settlements, rivers, and native wildlife are delineated by delicate markings of the legendary cattle trails that helped define the economic vitality of nineteenth-century Texas. Modern Texas portrays Fort Worth in the early-twentieth century, focusing on urban life. The central vignette depicts an expansive sky but features the city's prominent skyline and broadened Trinity River. The distant viewpoint implies the future with the potential for growth and prospect for change.The diptych's separation reflects storytelling and how memory and intuition create understanding and perception.
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Vernon Fisher | Early Texas/ Modern Texas | 2005 | Oil on Hardboard | Fort Worth Convention Center
Donald Lipski's signature style of creating whimsical installations from commonplace objects uses metaphor to evoke Fort Worth's unique western heritage. Beloved hats donated by native and 'honorary' Texans celebrate the friendly nature and collaborative spirit of Cowtown. The witty title is both a comment on the passionate attachment cowboys and cowgirls have to their hats and an anagrammatic gesture of thanks to the industrious hat wrangler Garlene Parris.
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Donald Lipski | Intimate Apparel & Pearl Earrings | 2005 | Mixed Media (400+Hats on Steel Armiture) | Fort Worth Convention Center
 
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